Walter Block on Why We Must Discriminate

From the Ludwig von Mises blog, and an excerpt from Walter Block’s own book The Case For Discrimination comes this quote:

It is clear that discrimination on the part of individuals, but of course not the state, is part of our birthright of liberty.

If not, coercive bisexuality would be the logical implication of the antidiscrimination movement. Why? Well, male heterosexuals despicably discriminate against half the human race as bed/sex/marriage partners: all other men. Nor can female heterosexuals plead innocence against this dread charge; they, too, abjure half of their fellow creatures in this regard. Can male homosexuals deflect this deadly indictment? No, they, too, refuse to have anything to do with all females in such a context. Similarly, female homosexuals, lesbians, also avoid entangling alliances of this sort with all men — again, half the human race.

No, it is the bisexuals, and only the bisexuals, who are entirely innocent of discrimination of this sort. They are the only decent people in the entire sexual spectrum to refrain from this evil practice. (We now disregard the fact that bisexuals also make invidious comparisons based on beauty, age, sense of humor, etc.)

Therefore, if we really opposed discrimination in matters of the heart, we would all embrace bisexuality. Because we do not, the logical implication is that we should be forced to do so. For to hang back from this conclusion is to give not only tacit but active approval to discriminatory practices, surely one of the worst things in the politically correct panoply.

It might well be objected that the laws against private parties discriminating should apply only to business, not personal, interactions. But why just in commerce and not also in human relations? Surely, if there is any such thing as the right not to be discriminated against, it applies in all realms of human existence, not merely in the marketplace. If we have a right not to be murdered, or stolen from, and we do, then this right pervades all realms of human existence. It is equally improper to be killed or robbed in the bedroom as it is in the store.

And, as a matter of fact, present antidiscrimination law does not even apply, across the board, in the commercial realm. Rather, it depends upon “power” relationships, a rather meaningless concept, at least as employed by our friends on the Left.

For example, if I hate Chinese people, and therefore will not patronize their restaurants, I violate no law. However, if the owner of the Chinese restaurant, for example, despises Jews, he will not be legally able to forbid them from entry onto his premises. Why? Because sellers, in this case, are deemed to be more “powerful” than buyers.

But it does not always work in this way. If a large buyer, say, Wal-Mart, refused to purchase from any female-headed firm because of their taste for discrimination against women, they would not for a moment be able to get away with such a policy.

Read the rest here. Buy the book here!

I personally, and philosophically agree with Block on this. We discriminate every day. It’s how we decide who we should befriend, who we should stay clear from; who we should love, who we should distance ourselves from. I’ve written about this before. See here and here.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: